Summary of how carbon dating works






Lackner is one of hundreds, if not thousands, of scientists around the world who are working on ways to remove CO 2 from the atmosphere, capturing carbon from the atmosphere using plants, rocks or engineered chemical reactions and storing it in soil, products such as concrete and plastic, rocks, underground reservoirs or the deep blue sea.

All actions for the previous level, plus:
Widen the scope of carbon footprint to include third party emissions .
Engage third parties at and around the airport.

Since all living things contain the element carbon, it is one of the most abundant elements on Earth. The total amount of carbon on Earth, whether we are able to measure it accurately or not, always remains the same, although the carbon regularly changes its form. A particular carbon atom located in someone's eyelash may have at one time been part of some now-extinct species, like a dinosaur. Since the dinosaur died and decomposed millions of years ago, its carbon atoms have seen many forms before ending up as part of a human being. It may have been part of several plants and trees, free-floating in the air as carbon dioxide, locked away in the shell of a sea creature and then buried at the ocean bottom, or even part of a volcanic eruption. Carbon is found in great quantities in Earth's crust, its surface waters, the atmosphere, and the mass of green plants. It is also found in many different chemical combinations, including carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ), as well as in a huge variety of organic compounds such as hydrocarbons (like coal, petroleum, and natural gas).


Summary of how carbon dating works

Summary of how carbon dating works